The Journal of Intelligence, Conflict, and Warfare

Current Issue

Vol. 3 No. 3 (2021)
Published January 31, 2021
2020 West Coast Security Conference Proceedings on Contemporary Conflict

Technology’s role in spreading extremism and the development of cyber capabilities by non-state actors present new challenges to policing and defence in the 21st century. The third annual CASIS West Coast Security Conference presented an opportunity for academics and practitioners to share information regarding extremist movements, the role of data analytics, cyber aggression, and the impact of artificial intelligence in shaping the future of defence strategy. The following pieces are a reflection of presentations and discussion panels that took place during our five-day conference. This edition may be used to inform responses to emerging national and international security threats of a non-traditional and often ambiguous nature. 

Editor’s Note

I am pleased to present Volume 3 Issue 3 of the Journal of Intelligence, Conflict, and Warfare inspired by CASIS Vancouver’s 3rd Annual West Coast Security Conference: The Shape of Contemporary Conflict. Not only was this our most successful conference to date, but the insightful conversations that were borne from the many impactful presentations brought to light new and exciting ideas worth further exploration and research. The three thought provoking articles chosen for this issue represent some of these ideas which I hope inspire others to further discussion and research on contemporary threats and emerging trends in security.

The goal for this issue was to provide those who were unable to join us at our conference with a written synopsis of the themes and research presented. A key pillar of CASIS Vancouver is the dissemination of knowledge and research, which is predominantly achieved through the triannual publication of this journal. As the ever-present COVID-19 pandemic introduced a heightened sense of instability and insecurity around the world in 2020, our hope is that the research presented at the conference, and herewith, will bring a sense of reassurance as to the future of the security sphere. My hope is that, with a vaccine now being rolled out, my colleagues and my fellow academics and practitioners will be inspired and unencumbered to continue their research and writing. I look forward to the wide range of engaging submissions to this journal in the coming months.

Finally, I would like to thank my production team and those authors and reviewers who have risen to the occasion during these uncertain times to continue their hard work and dedication to this journal. I am immensely grateful to a new member of the production team, Nancy Mireles, who stepped into the production coordinator position and gracefully ensured that this 2020 Conference Proceedings Special Issue was published meticulously. Moreover, the reliability and hard work embodied by each member of the production team – Marco Autelitano, Eduardo Franco, Anika Kale, Jonathan Lee, Amanda Makosso, and Gurpreet Tung – has been a source of immense pride and comfort to myself and the rest of the Journal’s management team. Thank you.

Sincerely yours,

Candyce Kelshall


Announcements

Call for Papers Topics

Find the list of Call for Papers until 2022!

 


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February 12, 2021

Conference Briefing Notes

Vincent Virk
55-58
Leading in a Data Centric Society
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2529
PDF
Mark Masongsong
59-62
Data Analytics and Public Safety
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2530
PDF
Sophia Moskalenko
63-65
Radicalization in the Age of Social Media: Mass Identity Manipulations (MIMs)
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2539
PDF
Duong Vu
66-69
Leveraging Big Data to Detect Amenity Gaps to Improve Public Safety
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2565
PDF
Chloe Bynoe
70-72
What Security Means to Me
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2574
PDF
Adam Palmer
73-75
Artificial Intelligence and Police Decision Making Processes
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2575
PDF
Phil Gratton
76-79
Intelligence Challenges of the Data Rich World
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2580
PDF
CASIS Vancouver
80-82
EU PROPHETS project on policing tools for terrorism
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2581
PDF
CASIS Vancouver
83-87
Detecting and Combating Deep Fakes
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2752
PDF
CASIS Vancouver
88-90
How policing has changed since COVID-19
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2753
PDF
CASIS Vancouver
90-93
Cyber investigation: A new frontier for police
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2754
PDF
CASIS Vancouver
94-97
Revisiting Disruptive Technology and the Innovator’s Dilemma in the Age of Cybersecurity
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2764
PDF
CASIS Vancouver
98-100
Drone Warfare in Transnational Armed Conflict and Counterterrorism
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2765
PDF
CASIS Vancouver
101-105
The Challenges of Data Acquisition and the Use of Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2766
PDF
CASIS Vancouver
106-110
Spy watching: Intelligence accountability in the United States
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2767
PDF
CASIS Vancouver
111-113
Social Media as a Recruitment Tool by Extremist Groups
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2768
PDF
CASIS Vancouver
114-116
Policing in the 21st Century
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2769
PDF
CASIS Vancouver
117-119
The Use of Popular Culture and Norms by Extremists
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2770
PDF
CASIS Vancouver
120-124
Intelligence and Risks Posed by Corruption
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2774
PDF
CASIS Vancouver
125-127
Lessons from the Cambridge Analytica Crisis: Confronting Today's (Dis)information Challenges
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2775
PDF
CASIS Vancouver
128-131
Policing During COVID-19: Perspectives from MET Police, UK
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2778
PDF
John Ferris
132-135
Behind the Enigma: The Authorized History of GCHQ, Britain's Secret Cyber-Intelligence Agency
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2795
PDF
Clark McCauley
136-138
Countering Extremist Violence (CEV)
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2796
PDF
Julian Richards
139-141
Extremist Propaganda and the 'Politics of the Internet'
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2798
PDF
Victoria Dittmar
142-145
Organized Crime Groups in Latin America and TREX-Hybridity
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2799
PDF
Candyce Kelshall
146-153
Soft Violence, Social Radicalisation, and Violent Transnational Social Movements (VTSMs)
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2800
PDF
Shandon Harris-Hogan
154-158
Countering Violent Extremism: Perspectives from the Australian Context
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2808
PDF
Natalie Archutowski, Serge Bergler
159-164
Gen Z as Security Content Creators: Recreating the Terms of the Social Contract
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2809
PDF
Julien Bellaiche
165-169
QAnon: A rising threat to democracy?
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2816
PDF
Archilus Phillips
170-175
Interagency Collaboration and National Security
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2817
PDF
Viveca Greene
176-177
The Use of Memes and Satire by the Alt-right and Gen Z Activists – Exclusion vs Inclusion
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2818
PDF
Andrew Hayes
178-181
Combatting Terrorism and Extremism in Wales: Operational Policing
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2819
PDF
John Ardis
182-186
Applied (Active Measures) Counterintelligence
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2822
PDF
Rizwan Mustafa
187-191
Islamic Extremism
https://doi.org/10.21810/jicw.v3i3.2823
PDF
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